Announcements

Ancient Readers and Ancient Books: Reading Vergil in Antiquity

Thursday, October 20 | Griffin Hall, Room 7 Raymond Starr, Theodora Stone Sutton Professor of Classics at Wellesley College will discuss reading in Ancient Rome. Ancient Roman readers were affected by the physical form of their literature—in individually hand-copied scrolls, entirely in capital letters without word division or systematic punctuation—but also by widely shared cultural assumptions

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“The Frank, the Friendly, and the Fictional: Speech in the Fragments of Lucilius’ Satires.”

Thursday, March 10 | 7:00 PM | Griffin Hall, Room 6 Catherine Keane, Associate Professor, Department of Classics at St. Louis’ Washington University, will discuss Roman poets of verse satire who combined moralistic diatribe with dialogue and narrative about social life, and who looked back to the second-century-BCE Lucilius as the inventor of their genre. The

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Philosophia in Cicero’s Speeches

A public lecture presented by Walter Englert Omar & Althea Hoskins Professor of Classical Studies at Reed College Among the finest orators of his age, Cicero built up his career and his life by means of public speech. But Cicero was also a devoted student of Greek philosophy, and in his philosophical works he experimented

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When Gods and Demons Learn to Read: Inscribed Greek Amulets of the Roman Imperial Period

Christopher Faraone, Frank and Gertrude Springer Professor in the Humanities and the College Department of Classics at the University of Chicago, examined the so-called ‘wing-‘ and heart-shaped’ texts found both on amulets and in non-amuletic magical material of ancient Greece. Thursday, April 23 | 7:00–8:30 PM

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Cicero and the Library of Lucullus

Stephanie Ann Frampton, Assistant Professor of Classical Literature at MIT, presented “A Stoic in the Library: Cicero and the Villa Library of Lucullus,” an investigation of the cultural status of libraries in ancient Rome in the late Republican period, before the development of more familiar imperial and “public” libraries. Frampton examined the fictionalized encounter between Cicero and Cato

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Summer Internships at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History, March 1 Deadline

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History has many internship opportunities year-round, however their summer session is the largest and most competitive of the year. Summer internship deadline is March 1, 2014. 1. Archives Center – Interns undertake projects involving preparation of collections for research use and dissemination of collections information through print and electronic

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Going Greek: Jewish Translation in the Ancient Mediterranean

Tuesday, November 12 7:00pm Griffin Hall, 7  Tessa Rajak, the 2013 Visiting Croghan Bicentennial Professor in Classics at Williams College, will present “Going Greek: Jewish Translation in the Ancient Mediterranean”. A Greek version of the Torah was commissioned, according to legend, for the great Library of Alexandria. It is often forgotten that the Jewish community

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Mothers as Martyrs: The Mother of the Maccabees Among Jews and Christians

Tuesday, November 5 7:00pm Griffin Hall, 7  Tessa Rajak, the 2013 Visiting Croghan Bicentennial Professor in Classics at Williams College, will present the first of two lectures, “Mothers as Martyrs: The Mother of the Maccabees Among Jews and Christians.” All are welcome, this lecture is free and open to the public. According to Jewish legend,

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East-West Relations Conference, October 10-11, 2013

The Williams College Classics Department is pleased to present a conference on East-West Relations in the Ancient World from Cyrus I to the Abbasid Caliphate, October 10-11, 2013. In recent years, there has been a major shift in how scholars characterize social, cultural and political interactions between Eastern and Western empires in the ancient world.

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Williams Students in Omrit

Be sure to check out the Omrit Archaeological Excavations Official Student Blog here: http://sites.williams.edu/williamsinomrit/ You will be able to keep up to date with the Williams students are experiencing while participating in the excavation of Omrit, an ancient site in the northeast corner of the Hulah Valley in Israel. The experience allows Williams students to get their

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